Free Virtual Consultations Available

How to Know if You Need Reconstructive Burn Surgery

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, thousands of people die in fires and from burn-related complications every year. Those who are fortunate enough to survive fire-related incidents often deal with pain, deformities, and skin conditions, even after years of healing.

If you’ve been injured in a fire, reconstructive burn surgery may be able to help you. Elliott H. Rose, MD, of The Aesthetic Surgery Center has been changing the lives of burn victims with reconstructive burn surgery for more than 25 years. In this blog, Dr. Rose discusses what it involves.

Who can benefit?

Burn surgeries are often classified as either acute or reconstructive. Most burn victims will require acute burn care from a team of specialized trauma surgeons immediately following a fire-related accident. 

Reconstructive surgery is usually undergone some time after the incident. The aim of this type of surgery is to help the patient regain function, comfort, and appearance. For example, if skin is discolored, treatment can help provide new skin for the area. If burn scarring is causing tightness, treatment can help return freedom of motion.

Patients seeking burn reconstruction surgery are usually advised to wait at least a year after the injury to give the body time to heal and improve discoloration and skin texture.

Types of reconstructive burn surgery

Although burn scarring can’t be erased completely, there are many techniques that can greatly improve the skin’s appearance and function. Dr. Rose brings more than 25 years of experience to The Aesthetic Surgery Center in treating burn victims, using traditional and advanced medical techniques. 

Skin grafts

This technique involves removing healthy skin from another part of the body and transplanting it onto damaged skin cells to encourage skin regrowth. After the surgery, the skin graft is usually wrapped in a bandage to help prevent an infection.

Tissue expansion

Tissue expansion is a reconstruction technique that involves inserting a balloon-like device under the skin to help regrow and reshape damaged areas. The device is filled with a saline mixture, which helps gently stretch skin into a more desirable shape.

Free flap procedure

This technique is often used to resurface severe burns by using skin, muscle, or bone from a donor site, and placing it on the burn site. Microsurgery and persistent wound care is often used with the free flap procedure.

If you have a burn-related injury, Dr. Rose can help. In your first consultation, Dr. Rose will review your medical history and burn areas to come up with a custom treatment plan that best suits your needs. To learn more, book an appointment online or over the phone with The Aesthetic Surgery Center today.

You Might Also Enjoy...

Types of Burns and How We Can Help

While first- and second-degree burns heal with care at home, third-degree burns cause serious tissue damage and can even be life-threatening. Here are different types of burns and how treatment helps.

My Child Has a Neurofibroma. Now What?

A neurofibroma is a noncancerous nerve tumor that develops under the skin. When it appears in children, it’s often a sign of neurofibromatosis type 1, a genetic condition. Here are your next steps if your child has a neurofibroma.

Three Types of Skin Cancer and How They’re Treated

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States and the world. But all skin cancers are not the same. Here’s what you should know about each type and how treatment helps you reduce scarring and other complications.

Understanding Buccal Fat and Options for Removing It

Removal of buccal fat, or a cheek or midface lift, gives you a more youthful look and counteracts hollowing below the lower eyelid. Here’s why you should be concerned with these fat pads that sit between your cheekbones and jaw bones.

Am I at Risk of Bell's Palsy?

Bell’s palsy can affect anyone at any stage of their life. Certain factors do make you more vulnerable to the condition. Here’s who is at greatest risk.